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MyMoneyCoach Blog

Welcome to the MyMoneyCoach.ca blog where we share our best strategies and information to help you make smarter choices with your money. If you're coming back for an older article, you can find it here.

3 Reasons to Check Your Free Full Credit Report

Full Credit ReportFew things are free in life, but thankfully, checking your full credit report is one of those things. Equifax Canada and TransUnion Canada, our official credit bureaus, each have their own version of your credit report. Other companies pull info from these reports when making decisions like whether to approve a credit application. If you haven’t checked your report before, here are 3 reasons why you should do so now for free. Read more . . . 

Avoid Donating Yourself Into Debt – Outline Your Budget & Other Ways to Give Support

Donating ClothesCharitable organizations and the people they serve are extremely appreciative of the donations and support they receive. Most depend on fundraising and the generosity of the community. However, there can be times when donating financially isn’t possible, even if you have a longstanding commitment to doing that. If your financial situation worsened and you cut back on your expenses accordingly, it’s normal to feel guilty if a charity you’ve been supporting asks for more help. Although you may not be able to donate as much as you did before, there are still many ways to be generous and support the causes you believe in. Read more . . . 

Soft vs Hard Credit Check in Canada: Credit Rating Impact & Common Questions Answered

Soft vs. Hard Credit CheckWondering what’s the difference between a soft vs hard credit check in Canada? Put simply, a hard check affects your credit rating, but a soft check doesn’t. Also known as credit inquiries or credit pulls, these are a way for companies to see the info on your credit report. Of course, you can also check your own report. Read on to learn more about what makes a soft credit check and what makes a hard one. Learn more . . . 

4 Money Mistakes that Are “Penny Wise Pound Foolish” (and How to Fix Them)

Penny Wise Pound FoolishWe all like to save money, but some tricks to save can actually cause costly money mistakes. You might have heard of this as being “penny wise pound foolish,” the origin of which comes from a quote in a 1600s book on melancholy. Having your efforts work against you can certainly feel discouraging! While there’s nothing wrong with counting pennies (or maybe nickels since we’re in Canada), seeing the big picture ensures you actually come out ahead. Read more . . . 

5 Money Saving Tips for a Single Person Grocery Budget

Single Person Grocery BudgetFiguring out a single person grocery budget that’s good for your wallet and stomach can be tricky. While there are plenty of grocery shopping tips that work for any household, living alone has its own quirks. So how much should a single person budget for groceries? The average cost of food per month for one person in Canada used to range from $225-$250, but can be much higher now due to rising living costs. Here are 5 tips to help keep that cost down when you’re by yourself. Read more . . . 

How to Back Out of a Financial Commitment with Family Gracefully

Backing Out of Financial Commitment with FamilyHas a family member asked you for financial support? Think twice about an agreement to provide a loved one with money or to co-sign a loan for them. As much as you might care for that person and want them to succeed, you also have to keep your own wellbeing in mind. When it comes to money issues and family, it’s never just about the money – it’s about the relationship, our values and beliefs, along with our behaviours. If you’re not certain about wanting or being able to help them, then backing out as soon as possible can be the best option for everyone. Read more . . . 

How to Save $5,000 in One Year with a Budget Money Plan

Save $5000 in a YearWant to save $5,000 in a year? That extra money in the bank could go towards your next big purchase, boost your savings or investments, or help you get rid of debt stress. However, actually saving $5k in 52 weeks can be a huge challenge if you’re not prepared. If you take advantage of the whole 52 weeks, however, you can do it by just saving $416.67 a month, $192.31 biweekly, $96.16 a week, or $13.70 a day. Less than $14 a day doesn’t sound so bad, does it? Read more . . . 

3 Tips to Help Teenagers Learn Money Management Skills

Help Teenagers Learn Money Management SkillsLearning money management skills will help teenagers be financially successful when they grow up, but many parents find this a big hurdle to jump over. They might feel uncomfortable exposing the family budget, find it hard to get their teens to care, or be unsure of their own money skills. Here are 3 tips for teaching teenagers the money management skills they need for the future. Read more . . . 

New Mortgage Rules: Are They Really What They Seem?

New Mortgage RulesWondering what Canada’s new mortgage rules mean in plain English? Understanding the stress test qualifying rate and other regulations is important when trying to buy a house – especially if you’re a first-time buyer. If you’re just starting your research, or have read something and just need a simple explanation to fill in the blanks, that’s what this page is for. Here’s what the changes to these rules really mean and how they may impact you. Read more . . . 

How to Save More Money When Social Media Makes You Want to Spend

Saving Money When Using Social MediaWorried that social media is making it hard to save more money each month? Managing our money is about more than simple financial decisions. Our emotions, thoughts and moods play a huge role in determining our spending choices. The trick to overcoming this is to stick with social media for the social part, but to keep it separate from the financial. Here are some realistic ways to save money and do just that. Read more . . .